Poème électronique - Edgar Varèse

Poème électronique (English Translation: "Electronic Poem") is an 8-minute piece of electronic music by composer Edgard Varèse, written for the Philips Pavilion at the 1958 Brussels World's Fair. The Philips corporation commissioned Le Corbusier to design the pavilion, which was intended as a showcase of their engineering progress. Le Corbusier came up with the title Poème &eacute saying he wanted to create a "poem in a bottle".Varèse composed the piece with the intention of creating a liberation between sounds and as a result uses noises not usually considered "musical" throughout the piece. 

First presented at the 1958 Brussels Worlds Fair with 425 speakers placed throughout the famous Philips pavilion, the placement of the speakers and design of the building gave the spectators a feeling of being housed within a concrete, silver seashell. A giant model of the atom hung from the ceiling and the sound & imagery premiered to standing room only crowds and I can only imagine was a complete mind-blower to all who witnessed the spectacle. Varese is considered to be the "father of electronic music", Henry Miller described him as the "stratospheric colossus of sound." When Philips (Philips electronic company) approached Le Corbusier to design a building for the fair, Le Corbusier said, "I will not make a pavilion for you (Philips) but an Electronic Poem and a vessel containing the poem; light, color, image, rhythm and sound joined together in an organic synthesis."

The images in Le Corbusier's film are all black and white still photographs and willfully abstract. The first image is a bull's head in a spotlight. The final image is a woman holding an infant. Le Corbusier assigned thematic sections to the film: 

WATCH IT HERE
0 – 60" Genesis
61 – 120" Spirit and Matter
121 – 204" From Darkness to Dawn
205 – 240" Man-Made Gods
241 – 300" How Time Moulds Civilization
301 – 360" Harmony
361 – 480" To All Mankind
The sequence of sounds in Varèse's composition:

Poème électronique